S.C. Turnbo manuscripts

MS.000249

Repository: Arkansas State Archives
Title: S.C. Turnbo manuscripts
Quantity: 0.4 Cubic feet
Call number: MS.000249
Language: Materials entirely in English.


Biographical/Historical Note

Silas Claiborn Turnbo (1844-1925) was a pioneer historian of the Ozarks region of north Arkansas and south Missouri.

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Scope and Contents

This is a collection of 278 of Silac C. Turnbo's manuscripts numbering from 540 to 819 with 589 missing.

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Restrictions
Conditions Governing Access

This collection is open for research use.

Conditions Governing Use

The copyright law of the United States (Title 17-U.S. Code) governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted material. The person using this material is liable for any infringement.

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Administrative Information
Preferred Citation

S.C. Turnbo Manuscripts, Arkansas History Commission, Little Rock, Arkansas.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Marvin E. Tong, Jr., Ardmore, Oklahoma, 1980.

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  • 540. Recollections of a pioneer, page 1

  • 541. An extreme old age, page 4

  • 542. The first settlement at Peel, Arkansas, page 5

  • 543. Before Lead Hill was a town, page 6

  • 544. The Sisney grave yard, page 8

  • 545. A cooper who lived in a cave, page 10

  • 546. The names of a few pioneer people, page 12

  • 547. Died at an extreme old age, page 14

  • 548. On the head of Swan Creek in the pioneer days, page 16

  • 549. More about Yellville and the early residents there and vicinity, page 19

  • 550. A part of an account of the Coker family: biographical and historical, page 21

  • 551. Five children who were saved from the Mountain Meadow massacre, page 27

  • 552. A few items of early times at Warsaw and vicinity, page 29

  • 553. More recollections of early days, page 32

  • 554. Amoung the old settlers of Marion County, Arkansas, and the school children at Yellville in the early days, page 38

  • 555. The killing of Daniel Wickersham, page 39

  • 556. The graves of two Confederate soldiers, page 40

  • 557. The Taburs who were early settlers on Big Creek, page 42

  • 558. Was very old, page 44

  • 559. Recollections of a widow woman, page 45

  • 560. A few reminiscences, page 48

  • 561. A short account of Shoal Creek and pro-tem, page 51

  • 562. A few names of the early residents, page 54

  • 563. Two deaths on Shoal Creek in the early days, page 58

  • 564. Tom Norman and his family and the death of four of them, page 60

  • 565. Something about the writers people, page 63

  • 566. Bits of history, page 66

  • 567. Where John Ramsey was hung, page 69

  • 568. An early pioneer, page 71

  • 569. Among the pioneers of Richland Creek, page 74

  • 570. Where John P. Vance is buried, page 78

  • 571. Oakland Arkansas, page 79

  • 572. A death stricken family, page 81

  • 573. Brief items of interest which occurred at Yellville and on Jimmies Creek in the long ago, page 83

  • 574. Reminiscences by Captain J.C. (Curtis) Rea, page 86

  • 575. A few names of early residents, page 88

  • 576. The first settlement made at Pontiac, Missouri, page 91

  • 577. One of the fearless defenders of the Alamo, page 93

  • 578. Found death in the woods, page 95

  • 579. A few more old items about Green County, page 100

  • 580. Looking back in the past, page 102

  • 581. Early times in St. Clair County, Missouri, page 106

  • 582. Where a few pioneers lie buried, page 109

  • 583. Panther bottom stories and how the bottom derived, page 110

  • 584. Forsyth in 1837 and the early settlement of Swan Creek, page 113

  • 585. Old time memories of the buck bottom, page 117

  • 586. Wm. Holt and family and the Holt farm, page 120

  • 587. A short history of the Lize Friend grave yard on Little North Fork, page 123

  • 588. A few names of the pioneer settlers on the left prong of crooked creek and vicinity, page 126

  • 590. A few names of men who were slain in war days, page 128

  • 591. Several old time items worthy of interest, page 129

  • 592. She remembers when the land office was established at Springfield, Missouri, page 133

  • 593. A moving family, page 135

  • 594. Among the pioneer Hogan people, page 137

  • 595. Gainsville, Missouri and Lick Creek, page 138

  • 596. George Washington Bingham, page 141

  • 597. Among the dead, page 144

  • 598. Corn shucking in Arkansas when snow was on the ground, page 147

  • 599. A few thoughts of the past, page 151

  • 600. Was twelve years old when he put on his first pair of shoes, page 153

  • 601. Raising crops in the pioneer days, page 154

  • 602. An old letter, page 155

  • 603. How the people received their mail and how taxes was collected in the early days, page 157

  • 604. The Hollingsworth mill and stories as given by the proprietor, page 159

  • 605. Hauling salt from St. Louis to Forsyth, page 171

  • 606. Low wages and a small price for cattle in the early days, page 173

  • 607. Dialogue between Sam Johnson and a traveler, page 175

  • 608. An old fashioned barbecued dinner, page 177

  • 609. Harvesting wheat, getting it out and milling it in early days, page 180

  • 610. Fall of the boasting young fellow, page 181

  • 611. In a row over a game of crack a blow, page 183

  • 612. Mob violence, page 186

  • 613. The Long grave on Gooley’s Spring Creek, page 188

  • 614. She wanted the infant to have enough to eat, page 192

  • 615. An old time lawsuit, page 194

  • 616. Spoiling his boots, page 196

  • 617. A little horse race, page 197

  • 618. A long time ago, page 199

  • 619. A long move in the long ago, page 202 Page 202

  • 620. A few incidents of the pioneer days of Shannon County, page 206

  • 621. A few items of early times, page 210

  • 622. His recollections of being at the first religious service, page 213

  • 623. Eloped with his wifes brother wife, page 214

  • 624. “Pitcher” Potts and Col. Wm. C. Mitchell of Carrollton, Arkansas, in early times, page 217

  • 625. The first circuit court, page 222

  • 626. Brief items as given by an early resident on Findley Creek, page 224

  • 627. Plowing during early times, page 227

  • 628. Travelers voting in Arkansas in the bygone days, page 229

  • 629. He learned the value of deer hides and made better use of them, page 231

  • 630. Some of the ways and doings of the early times, page 233

  • 631. A circuit court and a swing in old times, page 235 Page 235

  • 632. The time when it took 6 months for a letter to pass from north Arkansas to north Missouri, page 238

  • 633. Ashamed of his pants, page 242

  • 634. Her first pair of shoes, page 243

  • 635. He went home without his pants, page 244

  • 636. Something about blacksmith shops and the distribution of mail in the early days, page 246

  • 637. In green and stone counties Missouri in the by gone days, page 247

  • 638. Pioneer talk, page 249

  • 639. More incidents of early days at Yellville, Arkansas, page 253

  • 640. Old time recollections of Elbow Shoals, page 258

  • 641. Recollections of early days in Marion County, Arkansas, as told by a lady contributor, page 267

  • 642. Stories of pioneer days in northwest Arkansas, page 273

  • 643. The 4th of July at Forsyth in 1848, page 278

  • 644. Hunting and freighting in the early days, page 280

  • 645. Early times in St. Louis County, Missouri, page 282

  • 646. Recollections of the first introduction of sorghum seed, page 284

  • 647. How sod land was broke in the pioneer’s days, page 286

  • 648. It was wonderful to them, page 288

  • 649. His last dance, page 290

  • 650. An interview with a pioneer settler of Bryants Fork, page 293

  • 651. Early experience, page 297

  • 652. Was 3 years old when he seen his first bear, page 299

  • 253. Raising flax for home use in the early days, page 302

  • 654. Substituting a milk cow for a horse, page 303

  • 655. Exposed by a horseshoe, page 305

  • 656. How a young man was whipped for stealing sugar and other articles, page 312

  • 657. How a thief was caught in a steel trap, page 317

  • 658. Found hung in the woods, page 320

  • 659. Apprehending a murderer in Arkansas, page 322

  • 660. Not a Missourian, page 325

  • 661. Going to school in his shirt tail, page 328

  • 662. Among the schools and school children in the pioneer days, page 329

  • 663. Where I learned the alphabet, page 330

  • 664. A sleepy school teacher, page 332

  • 665. An old time country school, page 334

  • 666. How he learned his alphabet, page 337

  • 667. The first school house built at Prairie Grove, Arkansas, page 338

  • 668. More running foot tracks than teaching, page 341

  • 669. Going to school and wading Rubidoo Creek, page 343

  • 670. Cruel punishment of a little girl at school, page 345

  • 671. In Howard County, Missouri, page 347

  • 672. The long haired school teacher, page 348

  • 673. His first experience at school, page 350

  • 674. Something about schools in the early days, page 351

  • 675. Early school days on Big Creek, page 356

  • 676. How a school was taught in the pioneer days of southeast Missouri, page 357

  • 677. Early school days near Bloomfield, Missouri, page 359

  • 678. Working for the education of their children, page 360

  • 679. The grief of a mother about her starving children, page 362

  • 680. A sad scene, page 363

  • 681. Nearly famished for food, page 364

  • 682. Bewildered in the wild woods, page 366

  • 683. Experience of two boys in hunting for breadstuff in war days, page 369

  • 684. Hardships and starvation in the turbulent days of war, page 372

  • 685. Carrying bread corn from the Arkansas River to the west fork of the White River on horse back, page 373

  • 686. A mixture of stories in one chapter, page 375

  • 687. Pioneer incidents on Sugar Loaf Prairie and vicinity: Among the wolves and buffalo, page 381

  • 688. Two settlers kill a bear near a cabin, page 389

  • 689. They shot a favorite dog, page 394

  • 690. A few incidents of the battle of Wilson Creek and a glimpse at hunting, page 396

  • 691. A way back in the early days of Madison County, Arkansas, page 404

  • 692. Horrible incident of the war and other family history, page 409

  • 693. The sad fate of a hunter, page 414

  • 694. Trampled to death by a horse, page 417

  • 695. Lay out in the bitter cold, page 419

  • 696. The drowning of Sam Nard and Miss Hanna Friend in the early days of Marion County, Arkansas, page 422

  • 697. A faithful father and son, page 425

  • 698. Frozen in the cold and snow, page 426

  • 699. Death of a sick woman at the road side, page 429

  • 700. A dying man tells how he is haunted, page 430

  • 701. Mistook him for a wild turkey and killed his own son, page 437

  • 702. Lost and died in the deep snow, page 439

  • 703. A hunter kills his friend through mistake, page 441

  • 704. Burned to death, page 442

  • 705. Sad misfortune of a family, page 444

  • 706. The drowning of Sam Johnson, page 450

  • 707. A sad story of the long ago, page 454

  • 708. A womans dress saturated with the blood of her dead husband, page 458

  • 709. Disappeared entirely, page 460

  • 710. Sad account of a lost child, page 461

  • 711. Sad fate of Isaac Johnson, page 465

  • 712. A desperate fight among a small band of Indians, page 470

  • 713. Chased by a band of Indians, page 473

  • 714. Attacked by a small band of Indians, page 481

  • 715. Gambling with the Indians, page 482

  • 716. Stories of the Shawnee Indians, page 483

  • 717. An old Indian camp ground, page 490

  • 718. A praying Indian chief and other stories of the red men, page 491

  • 719. A night alarm, page 497

  • 720. Scared by the Indians and stung by nettles, page 501

  • 721. An incident of the great rise in White River in 1824, page 503

  • 722. A cloud burst and a big overflow, page 509

  • 723. A remarkable period of ice and snow , page 513

  • 724. How the great meteoric shower was seen and felt in Hall County, Georgia, page 517

  • 725. How a merry dance was changed to a devoted prayer meeting, page 519

  • 726. How the display appeared at Athens, Tennessee, and its effect on the people, page 521

  • 727. How the remarkable shower of meteors was observed on the Ohio River, page 524

  • 728. Seen the shooting stars, page 527

  • 729. How the memorable meteoric display was observed at Yellville, Arkansas, page 531

  • 730. Saved by a dog, page 534

  • 731. Fast in a hollow tree, page 538

  • 732. A turkey hunter in trouble, page 541

  • 733. Perils of a man and his three sons while fire hunting one night on the White River, page 545

  • 734. A frightful runaway, page 548

  • 735. The prayers of a devoted wife saves her sick husband from death, page 551

  • 736. A wonderful escape from drowning, page 555

  • 737. Saved by an otter hide, page 558

  • 738. Entrapped under a wagon box, page 563

  • 739. Narrow escape from death, page 565

  • 740. Saved by a silver half dollar, page 567

  • 741. His sentence was commuted, page 568

  • 742. They had shot the wrong man, page 571

  • 743. He was afraid of Indians, page 573

  • 744. In the midst of death, page 576

  • 745. How the insult was resented, page 579

  • 746. The strange preacher and the remarkable influence he had on sinners, page 582

  • 747. A foul murder, page 586

  • 748. Women were scarce, page 592

  • 749. Finding a badly rusted gun barrel in the woods, page 594

  • 750. Promoted to the game chicken of the walk, page 595

  • 751. The old hatter shop, page 598

  • 752. Fell over a precipice and was killed, page 601

  • 753. An appalling calamity by lightning, page 603

  • 754. A story of hidden gold and silver in the vicinity of Bee Creek, page 606

  • 755. How an early settler destroyed his life, page 608

  • 756. A day and part of a night at Rock Bridge one court week, page 610

  • 757. An exorbitant price for pulling a tooth, page 613

  • 758. A woman steals a mare and rides her to buffalo, page 614

  • 759. The King and Everette war at Yellville, Arkansas, page 616

  • 760. Shooting at a roguish bull, page 620

  • 761. Living in a bad sense, page 621

  • 762. He knocked the calf down as he was told to do, page 622

  • 763. Finding human skeletons in a cave, page 623

  • 764. It was strange, page 625

  • 765. Shot to death in a discussion of the war, page 627

  • 766. Finding a skeleton of a man in a wilderness

  • 767. A wonderful spring of water, page 634

  • 768. She did not want to be dead as bad as she pretended to, page 635

  • 769. A spring of blood, page 638

  • 770. How he remembered his mother, page 640

  • 771. He desired to hear the word of god, but the devil persuaded the man to listen to him, page 641

  • 772. Old Ned run away with the dead hog, page 642

  • 773. A dancing young fellow got his shoes burned up by the young lady dancers, page 644

  • 774. His gun was tricky and discharged itself twice in less than an hour, page 646

  • 775. Twelve pair of twins, page 647

  • 776. Disinterment of the remains of a young lady after she had been dead 12 or 13 years, page 650

  • 777. The rooster was enjoying a ride on the drift wood, page 652

  • 778. The prayer of a little girl for help, page 653

  • 779. He went to sleep and fell off his horse, page 657

  • 780. A sad scene at the dinner table, page 660

  • 781. Death of John Roberts, page 662

  • 782. Where Joe Allin was shot to death, page 664

  • 783. A novel way to hide money, page 665

  • 784. How sufficient salt for family use was saved throughout the Civil War, page 668

  • 785. Shot and wounded his mare for a buck deer, page 669

  • 786. Shot a sorrel mare for a deer, page 671

  • 787. Acting honorable, page 673

  • 788. He was absent minded and ruined his ax, page 676

  • 789. The men made eyes were cut into two parts, page 677

  • 790. Excitement over a dummy, page 678

  • 791. Nearly lost his breath at seeing a dummy, page 682

  • 792. Amusing incidents, page 685

  • 793. How Ned Cocker wanted the moles destroyed, page 687

  • 794. He spit in his face, page 689

  • 795. They slept in the bed tick, page 690

  • 796. He thought his wife had cut his throat, page 692

  • 797. Crittington and Tankus, page 694

  • 798. Early history of the grave yard at the mouth of Brattons Spring Creek, page 697

  • 799. They met in the chimney, page 702

  • 800. An amusing scene one Saturday night, page 704

  • 802. A foolish expression, page 709

  • 801. Silly remarks of a boy, page 708

  • 803. His brother had been sowing tares, page 710

  • 804. A happy courtship that ended with a tearful disappointment, page 714

  • 805. How he asked for his bride, page 716

  • 806. The boy obeyed, page 717

  • 807. The boaster missed the mark, page 718

  • 808. Torturing wolves by flaying them alive, page 720

  • 809. Killing a mare with an ax, page 724

  • 810. Flaying a possom alive, page 727

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